Ali, Papa and the Forty Thieves

Courtesy of adidas

Thoughts on the new adidas campaign:

Impossible is nothing (with the help of CGI).

Nike has already been here, though.

And so has Gatorade.

"Boxing is a lot of white men watching two black men beat each other up" — no matter what gender they are.

Talk about some sort of weird resolution of father-daughter psychoanalytical issues: whale on dad's virtual self for a while.

Remember this guy? "I am America. I am the part you won't recognize. But get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me." — Ali Senior has been radically depoliticized over the past few decades, hasn't he?

VirtuAli does not have Parkinson's disease — and he never will.

Rumble, young girl, rumble.

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One response to Ali, Papa and the Forty Thieves

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  1. Brittany Bell says:

    When reading the Ali, Papa and the Forty Thieves blog I came across the following quote; "Boxing is a lot of white men watching two black men beat each other up" — no matter what gender they are. I agree with this quote to some extent. Historically in the sport of boxing blacks competed as a means of white entertainment which can be seen through events such as the Battle Royal. Blacks were seen as inferior and this sport for blacks was portrayed as buffoonery. However, as the sport progressed to one on one fights, segregation was seen between the competitions. White boxers would only fight whites and blacks were therefore forced to fight blacks. In saying so, this principal was changed when Jack Johnson challenged The Great White Hope to the biggest fight in boxing which would not only make him the heavyweight champion of the world but would change society’s view of blacks. Blacks were now able to watch the boxing events as much as whites. As history developed, this quote became less valid as both races participate and observe to a more equal extent.